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Can Sleep Apnea Contributes to Hair Loss?

People with sleep apnea feel exhausted the next day, even after getting a “full” night’s rest. The very idea of having blocked or lapsed breathing is frightening enough, but those who really have it also suffer from secondary concerns including marital troubles, weight gain, and reduced cognitive functioning. These problems are caused by the secondary effects of the primary condition.

Even more concerning, research has shown that long-term impacts might hasten the development of hereditary characteristics such as androgenetic alopecia. In addition, there is a correlation between increased stress and living with sleep apnea symptoms, which raises further concerns regarding sleep and hair loss. This link cannot be denied. These preliminary findings raise the question of whether or not sleep apnea may lead to hair loss.

What Are the Roots of Hair Loss?

  • Certain haircuts that put a lot of stress on the follicles and the scalp, as well as treatments (such using hot oil);
  • Certain hormonal and medical situations, like pregnancy, thyroid problems, and alopecia areata;
  • Hair loss can be predicted by looking at a person’s family history. Androgenetic alopecia, often known as male-pattern baldness or female-pattern baldness, is the most prevalent cause of hair loss.
  • A traumatic incident or chronic stress 
  • Medications and health supplements connected to high blood pressure, arthritis, and some kinds of cancer

A study on sleep that was conducted in 2017 found a variety of connections between chronic sleep loss and both short-term and long-term health problems. The stress that is brought on by ongoing disturbance might hasten the manifestation of hereditary characteristics like androgenetic alopecia.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Alopecia

There is not a clear causative connection between alopecia and sleep apnea; nonetheless, there is sufficient data to show a link between the two conditions. It is normal for people to have daily hair loss, which is followed by the growth of new hair as a replacement. The circadian rhythm, also known as an internal clock, plays a role in this process.

A study that was done in 2014 discovered a connection between maintaining a regular circadian rhythm and maintaining the integrity of newly regenerated stem cell tissue. Hair follicles were affected by the extended interruption in the sleep-wake cycles of the animals that were studied. The findings raise additional concerns about the possible connection between insufficient sleep and thinning hair in humans.

The sleep-wake cycle has an impact on the production of melatonin, which is occasionally used topically as a treatment for balding or thinning hair. Secretion of melatonin occurs during typical periods of sleep, although this process can be hampered by conditions such as irregular sleep-wake cycles or chronic tiredness, both of which are symptoms of sleep apnea.

Poor sleep quality, obstructive sleep apnea, and hair loss are all linked.

The most frequent type of sleep apnea is called obstructive sleep apnea, and it is defined by the relaxation of the muscles of the throat. The relaxation makes it more difficult for air to move through, which results in snoring and a drop in the amount of oxygen in the blood. When the brain detects that a person is exerting themselves to breathe, it temporarily rouses them from sleep (so brief a sleeper may not remember). This cycle may recur more frequently than thirty times every hour during the night. Click here to get can exercises help reduce risk or improve symptoms of sleep apnea?

The disturbance accumulates over time, resulting in persistent fatigue and, in some circumstances, a neurobiological ‘cost’ or ‘sleep debt.’ A lack of quality sleep is the first step in the cycle of sleep deprivation and hair loss. This leads to increased stress in one’s personal, professional, and familial life, which in turn adds to hair loss.

How does stress play a role in the thinning of hair that is associated with sleep apnea?

This can occur in one of three ways:

  • Psychosomatic reactions to stress, such as tugging at one’s hair or eyebrows, have been shown to be triggered by stress. Trichotillomania is an impulse control disorder that causes patients to compulsively pull off their hair.
  • When a person is under a significant amount of stress, their hair follicles enter a dormant or sleeping state. Because of the accumulation, the impacted hairs become more likely to break off when they are washed or combed in the future.
  • Severe stress triggers an immune system reaction, such as that seen in alopecia areata, which instructs the body to target hair follicles, resulting in hair loss.

Sleep Apnea Remedies

The condition can be treated with a variety of treatments, both at home and at medical facilities.

  • Increasing oxygen flow in the body by physical activity (yoga, running, etc.); this may be done by:
  • Keeping a healthy weight
  • Utilizing oral appliances (to keep airways open when sleeping)
  • Staying away from alcoholic beverages and tobacco products

CPAP treatment is something that medical professionals could recommend. Sleep apnea sufferers are able to reap the advantages of a restful night’s sleep thanks to the unblocking of their breathing passages by a CPAP machine. The continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine produces a steady flow of air and exerts just the right amount of pressure to keep the airway in the back of the neck open while the user sleeps soundly.

Benefits of Using a CPAP Machine Include:

  • Lower chance of getting type 2 diabetes
  • Lower risk of developing heart disease and stroke
  • an increase in attentiveness throughout the day
  • an improvement in both focus and emotional steadiness

What to Do If You’re Worried About Sleep Deprivation and Losing Your Hair

Consider undergoing a sleep study if you are experiencing symptoms that may be connected to sleep apnea or if you suspect that you may have sleep apnea symptoms. Not getting enough sleep may lead to a range of health problems, including heart disease, poor performance at work, and strained personal relationships, in addition to hair loss.

When it comes to enhancing the overall quality of your life, conducting research is an essential step. The most effective therapy as well as preventative measures can be prescribed by specialists once a thorough diagnostic has been performed. You have access to a number of different sleep tests, all of which are directed by knowledgeable and compassionate experts who are standing by to assist you.

Can Exercises Help Reduce Risk or Improve Symptoms of Sleep Apnea?

Can Exercises Help Reduce Risk or Improve Symptoms of Sleep Apnea?

One of the most common causes of interrupted sleep is a blocked airway, which is the case with those who suffer from sleep apnea. Because of this blockage, you will have trouble breathing while you sleep. Sleep apnea is characterised by snoring and periodic interruptions in breathing while sleeping. About 80% of those who snore have sleep apnea.

Although OSA is the most frequent, there are two other forms of sleep apnea.

When the airway is physically blocked during sleep, a condition known as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) develops. When the brain has trouble regulating the muscles responsible for breathing during sleep, a condition known as central sleep apnea (CSA) occurs. Mixed or complex sleep apnea occurs when a person has both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central sleep apnea (CSA) and so has obstructions from both conditions. Learn more can heart arrhythmias be linked to sleep apnea?

Exercising can help with the first two degrees of sleep disruption and the third level is beneficial in its own right. Not breathing when sleeping is a significant problem that can have major consequences for your health, as you may well know. Thanks to its ability to alleviate symptoms and prevent the onset of sleep apnea, exercise is a double-edged sword for your health.

Can Exercises Help Reduce Risk or Improve Symptoms of Sleep Apnea?

Physical Consequences of Sleep Apnea

Some of the organs and tissues that are impacted by sleep apnea are the brain, the heart, and the reproductive system. Because sleep apnea is so often overlooked, patients are often prescribed drugs and therapies that don’t provide optimal results. In the case of people with untreated sleep apnea, the effectiveness of medications like insulin and blood pressure medicine may be diminished.

When it comes to the negative consequences of OSA on the body, exercise has an even higher impact because it is also helping lessen the effect of sleep apnea. This is because many of the symptoms associated with OSA are also warning indicators.

Reduced sleep quality is a major consequence of OSA. This is because the exhaustion and physical repercussions of breathing difficulties sometimes persist even after a full night’s sleep.

Additional health issues that can be exacerbated by sleep apnea include:

Problems with cognitive function or memory loss; diabetes or pre-diabetes; excessive daytime sleepiness; erectile dysfunction; high blood pressure; gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); heart disease or heart failure;

Adding insult to injury, obstructive sleep apnea worsens with age and weight. That’s why it’s crucial to finish your therapy or get help if you suspect you have sleep apnea. The symptoms you’re experiencing won’t go away on their own, and they may get worse if you ignore them.

What methods exist for dealing with sleep apnea?

Before discussing the role of exercise in treating sleep apnea, it is crucial to realise that while weight reduction can assist OSA symptoms, it will not cure the illness.

Treatment with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine is the gold standard for treating sleep apnea and other breathing disorders during sleep.

Patients with sleep apnea can benefit from CPAP therapy by using a device that delivers a steady stream of air to their airway while they sleep. Consistent use of a CPAP device has been shown in several trials to improve cognitive function, reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attack, and even extend life expectancy.

Common treatments for sleep apnea include continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machines and dietary and lifestyle changes. Losing weight can help alleviate certain OSA symptoms, but it won’t cure the condition. Losing weight can help lessen symptoms and improve sleep quality, which makes sense given that being overweight can make the condition worse.

Can Exercise Cure Sleep Apnea, 

The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea increases with body mass index. It may be the most important contributor to sleep apnea for certain people. That’s because carrying more weight around your neck might cause your upper airway to get blocked, making breathing difficult. This is the root cause of the severe snoring that is a hallmark of OSA. The same is true for the lungs: excess body fat in the midsection can diminish lung volume and so limit one’s breathing ability.

One of the finest things you can do for yourself is to lose weight if you’re overweight or obese and have sleep apnea. Losing weight can help you breathe easier by reducing the pressure in your chest. This can help you stop snoring. The severity of OSA might be decreased by half with just a 10% to 15% weight loss in obese individuals.

Researchers found that moderately obese OSA patients may not need long-term CPAP therapy if they lost weight. When paired with CPAP treatment, losing weight can have additional health benefits.

As a result, this is where exercise comes in. Physical exercise is a key factor in achieving weight reduction success. Exercise may not even be the most beneficial part if you have OSA, even if weight loss can lower OSA severity by 50%.

Can Exercises Help Reduce Risk or Improve Symptoms of Sleep Apnea?

How to Treat Sleep Apnea with Throat Exercises

Additional exercises for the nose, mouth, and throat can aid in reducing or eliminating snoring in addition to the weight reduction benefits of aerobic activity.

When your airway muscles relax or protrude during sleep, you experience snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. These manoeuvres assist with nasal breathing as you sleep by training and strengthening the muscles that line the nasal passages, moving the tongue, and opening the mouth slightly.

Oropharyngeal exercise, also known as myofunctional treatment for sleep apnea, works on the muscles and soft tissues of the jaw, neck, and mouth. It’s a great way to train your tongue and jaw into a more comfortable resting position.

Some studies have found that myofunctional treatment can lessen the sleep apnea symptoms. One meta-analysis showed that patients treated with myofunctional therapy had a reduction in their apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) from 24.5 to 12.3. Reduces moderate apnea to a milder form of the condition.

Keeping your mouth and throat muscles toned and strong via daytime exercise might help reduce snoring and treat moderate obstructive sleep apnea by limiting muscular vibration during sleep. When performed in conjunction with a CPAP machine and a healthy lifestyle, these activities can be even more beneficial.

Exercises that focus on deep breathing can also assist with sleep apnea by opening and strengthening the muscles around the airways. Using them before bed can help you breathe more easily through your nose and keep your airways from collapsing as you sleep.

Knowing When to Seek the Advice of a Professional

Modifying your way of life can help your sleep apnea, but it may not be enough for severe cases. An expert in sleep medicine can help you choose which treatments are best for you.

You may take our sleep quiz to see whether you have sleep apnea if you haven’t been diagnosed with it yet. You can use it to evaluate your symptoms and determine if sleep apnea testing is necessary. A consultation and sleep study might be helpful if you have trouble sleeping. Get in touch with Air Liquide Healthcare right now to set up a consultation and learn more about the effective treatments available.

Getting a simple and quick sleep exam might be the difference between another night of bad sleep and the peaceful sleep you deserve if you have obstructive sleep apnea.